Wednesday, January 17, 2018

FELLOWSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT


 Congressional-Executive Commission on

China (CECC)


LIU XIAOBO FELLOWSHIP:

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC) is offering paid Fellowships to graduates of accredited Bachelor’s, Master’s, J.D. Programs, or current graduate-level students. CECC Fellowship positions are filled twice a year. The Summer term (Full-Time, 32-40 hours per week) begins approximately in mid-May and ends in August/September. The Fall-Spring term (Part-Time, 15-20 hours a week) begins approximately in early November and ends in late April. The precise start and end dates are determined based on the Commission’s schedule and the end dates can be negotiated based on Fellows’ needs. 

The CECC’s Liu Xiaobo Fellowship was created in honor of renowned Chinese Nobel Prize laureate and prominent political prisoner Liu Xiaobo, who died in state custody in July 2017, just weeks after officials reported that he was battling late-stage liver cancer. A writer, former literature professor, and human rights advocate, Liu Xiaobo was among the chief authors of Charter 08, an open statement calling for political reform and greater protection of human rights in China, which was released on December 10, 2008, to coincide with the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Human Rights Day. Liu was detained on December 8, 2008 and later arrested on the charge of “inciting subversion of state power” in connection with his work on Charter 08 and several political essays he wrote. At the time of his death, he had served nearly 8 years of an 11-year prison sentence. 

The Liu Xiaobo Fellowship provides significant educational and professional experience for individuals with a background in Chinese politics, law, and society, in addition to strong Chinese language skills. Fellows work closely with the Commission and its staff on the full array of issues concerning human rights, the rule of law, and governance in China (including criminal justice, institutions of democratic governance, environmental issues, religious freedom, freedom of expression, ethnic minority rights, women’s rights, etc.).

Fellows perform important research support tasks (often in Chinese), attend China-related events, meet human rights advocates and other professionals whose work is focused on China, and assist staff in the drafting of Commission analyses, in addition to other tasks. Click here for CECC analysis of recent developments in the rule of law and human rights in China. Interns may also perform research for the Commission’s Political Prisoner Database, which has been accessible to the public since its launch in November 2004 (click here to begin a search).

CECC Fellows will be paid $12/hour. Fellows are not eligible for any additional federal benefits. Further details are available on the Commission’s website at http://www.cecc.gov/about/employment-opportunities.  


REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Fellows must be U.S. citizens.  
  • Fellows must be a graduate of an accredited Bachelor’s, Master’s, or J.D. program, or a current graduate-level student.
  • Fellows should have completed at least some China-related coursework. It is also desirable that they have some background in one or more of the specific human rights and rule of law issues in the CECC legislative mandate.
  • Chinese language skills: fellows should be able to read Chinese well enough to assist with research in newspapers, journals, and on websites. More advanced Chinese language capability would be a plus. A successful candidate for a fellowship will often have lived or studied in mainland China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan.
APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:
Interested applicants should send a cover letter, resume, writing sample, and the names and contact information of two references to the CECC via e-mail to Judy Wright, Director of Administration, at judy.wright@mail.house.gov. NO phone calls, please.

Application Deadlines:

  • Summer Term: Applications must be received by our office no later than 11:59 P.M. (EST) on February 15.
  • Fall-Spring Term: Applications must be received by our office no later than 11:59 P.M. (EST) on August 15.
Cover Letter:
  • Please discuss in your cover letter how your professional goals, interests, and background relate to the Commission’s legislative mandate regarding human rights and the rule of law in China.
  • Brief statement addressing how your research skills, knowledge, and experience make you a suitable candidate for the CECC Liu Xiaobo Fellowship.
  • Please indicate in your cover letter whether you are able to read Mandarin Chinese for research purposes. If yes, please indicate your level of fluency, i.e. beginner, intermediate, advanced, or native fluency. If you have taken a Chinese language proficiency exam, such as the HSK or ILR, please indicate the highest score you have obtained.
  • Please indicate how you heard about this fellowship position.
Resume:
  • Please include relevant work history, coursework, education achievements, honors/awards received, and anything else that you feel will help our evaluation.
Writing sample:
  • Please provide a writing sample of no more than two pages and no more than 500 words (double spaced). Your submission must be your own work, and can be an excerpt of a longer piece.
References:
  • Please include their names, titles, phone numbers, and email addresses. 

ABOUT THE COMMISSION:

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China was created by Congress in October 2000 with the legislative mandate to monitor human rights and the development of the rule of law in China, and to submit an annual report to the President and the Congress. The Commission consists of nine Senators, nine Members of the House of Representatives, and five senior Administration officials appointed by the President.


Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Princeton US-China Coalition Global Governance Forum

This upcoming spring, PUCC is excited to be hosting the annual Global Governance Forum focused on US China relations. The PUCC Global Governance Forum will draw together 30 exceptional student delegates from universities across the US, China, and around the world. To ensure smaller-scale interaction of the highest caliber, we will select the 30 delegates through competitive application. At the conference, we plan to host: 1) lectures followed by Q and A 2) simulations of multilateral dialogue and 3) policy briefings. The policy briefings—a capstone of our forum—will have delegates work intensively in groups to formulate and present policy proposals outlining how countries can tackle a specific 21st century global challenge. From these activities, delegates from vastly different backgrounds will have the unique chance to trade perspectives, tackle timely world issues, and retain a global community of peers eager to shape 21st century US-China relations.
We are looking for talented applicants interested in US-China studies to participate in our conference.  We would love if you would reach out to your student body about this exciting opportunity.  Please view our website here for more information about the application process. 

About the Princeton US-China Coalition: it is a student organization founded to establish a transnational coalition of student leaders poised to face issues at the forefront of US-China policy.

Spring 2018 applications for Knowledge in Action Career Internship Fund (KACIF) Travel Grants

GW knowledge in Action Career Internship Fund

Spring 2018 applications for Knowledge in Action Career Internship Fund (KACIF) Travel Grants will be accepted starting Tuesday, January 16, 2018.
The KACIF Travel Grants are available to GW students who are participating in internships that will advance their career development and who need assistance in paying for their public transportation to and from their internship location.
This reimbursement, which cannot exceed $300.00, can be used only for necessarily unpaid internships, i.e., typically those internships with non-profit, governmental, educational, and non-governmental organizations that genuinely lack the financial resources to pay salaries or wages to their interns.
Applications will be accepted through myGW portal.
More information: http://go.gwu.edu/kaciftravel
If you have questions, please contact kaciftravel@gwu.edu.
The KACIF Travel Grant was initiated in collaboration with the GW Student Association and made possible through the generous support of alumni, parents, and other donors.

The George Washington University, Washington DC

Friday, January 12, 2018

Internship Opportunities for Summer


The American Enterprise Institute has several Asia related Internships for the summer:

 Summer Intern: Asian Economies:

Derek Scissors is a Resident Scholar at AEI, where he focuses on Asian economic issues, especially the Chinese and Indian economies and US economic relations with Asian countries. The Asian Economies intern will be responsible for researching and media monitoring of Chinese outward investment, fact-checking, and providing support for ongoing projects. Interested candidates should demonstrate a strong interest in Asian economics, the ability to conduct independent research, and strong analytic skills. Work ethic and attention to detail are highly valued. Ability to easily and quickly read Mandarin Chinese is required.
Link

Summer Intern: South Asia Studies

An intern in the South Asia Studies program at AEI will work closely with staff in the foreign and defense policy studies department on research relating to South Asian politics, economics, and security issues. The intern will focus specifically on India, but may also work on Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka or other regional topics as needed. Tasks will include gathering news clips from Indian and international news sources, researching Indian political economy and demographics, fact checking and editing articles, and producing literature reviews, as well as sesearch concerning the domestic and foreign policies of India and Pakistan to support Sadanand Dhume's regular column and book reearch. Some administrative work will be required to help assist with events and helping the scholar prepare for any speaking engagements and other ad hoc assignments. Desired skills: familiarity with Excel, PowerPoint, and Lexis Nexis. Hindu/Urdu language skills are a plus.

Excellent organizational and research skills are required, as are intellectual curiosity and initiative. Applicants should have a strong interest in, and knowledge of, American politics, political institutions, and history. A background in the history of political thought and American political thought is a definite plus.
Link


Summer Intern: Asian Studies

The Asian Studies internship will focus primarily on Asian security initiatives and U.S. strategy in the region. An intern will work under AEI scholars Dan Blumenthal and Michael Mazza focusing on China, Japan, South Korea, North Korea, and Southeast Asia. The major responsibility of department interns is conducting research for short- and long-term projects focusing on defense and security issues in the Asia Pacific, including China’s military modernization, American alliances in Asia, and other issues pertaining to East Asian affairs. Interns will also assist in staffing department events.
The ideal candidate will have a demonstrated interest in Asian security affairs, previous research or relevant internship experience, strong analytical and critical thinking skills, and the ability to work independently. Priority will be given to candidates with a full working proficiency in Chinese. Japanese/Korean language skills are beneficial, but not required.
Link

Additionally, the Asian Pacific American Institute for Congressional Studies is looking for a Spring Intern. See below for details:

The APAICS Office Internship at the APAICS office in Washington, D.C., provides exceptional students and young professionals with the opportunity to work with us in fostering programming and outreach to build the AAPI political pipeline. The position is for individuals interested in learning about nonprofit work. Interns will get a well-rounded experience and learn relevant skills for advocacy and work in the political sphere. 

Work and Responsibilities: 
• Event planning: 
 o Helping staff organize logistics for various events, including our annual awards gala and Congressional receptions 
• Communications: 
 o Drafting social media posts relevant to the mission of APAICS, Asian Pacific American civic engagement, and politics more generally 
 o Drafting newsletters, emails to our members, and press releases 
• Research: 
 o The individual will maintain our political database of AAPI elected officials and candidates running for elected office across the country. Following issues relevant to the AAPI community and legislative work by members of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus will also be necessary. Furthermore, the individual will also search for emerging community leaders to reach out towards for our political trainings. 

Qualifications 
This is an ideal internship for someone who can take on multiple projects in a responsible manner, is adaptive, and is committed to the APAICS mission. Although no previous experience with political work is necessary to apply, an eagerness towards engaging in the political process at all levels is desired. Strong writing, communication, and organizational skills are a necessity for success. Although the position is unpaid, APAICS offers a travel stipend to reimburse interns for the expenses directly related to their internship
Link

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Student Job Opportunities at the Sigur Center (FWS) [Updated Links]

The Sigur Center for Asian Studies is a university research institute and the academic home of the Asian Studies Program of the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. The Staff Assistant for Operations will be working directly with Sigur Center staff and faculty on a variety of financial tasks and responsibilities related to managing the Center’s events and programs, and other administrative duties to support the work of the Center. This is a great opportunity for students interested in Asian Studies and International Affairs to work closely with Sigur Center staff, faculty, and visiting scholars from Asia.

Sigur Center for Asian Studies FWS Staff Assistant – Operations (part-time)

Job Description: The Staff Assistant for Operations will play a central role in managing logistics and
financing for Sigur Center. This may include assisting staff in keeping track of event and program
expenditures; drafting and submitting financial expense reports; supporting administrative upkeep of
the Center; promoting the Sigur Center; and preparing additional materials as needed.
As a Sigur Center Staff Assistant, the position also entails staffing the Center's front desk, which encompasses answering the main phone line, greeting visitors, and processing mail. Other
administrative duties and special projects may include creating spreadsheets and reports, data entry,
editing, and supporting Sigur Center events. The Staff Assistant will also help in managing the Sigur
Center's social enterprise, including the Asia on E Street blog, Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr accounts.

Link: https://gwu.joinhandshake.com/jobs/1206782

Hours Per Week: 10
Hourly Wage: $12.50 (DC Minimum Wage)
Required Qualifications:
-Strong background in spreadsheet and admin software programs, especially Excel
-Experience in administrative duties
-Strong customer service and interpersonal skills
-Must possess a Federal Work Study (FWS) Award for the 2017-2018 academic year
Preferred Qualifications:
-Strong interest in Interest in/knowledge of International Affairs and Asia
-Some knowledge of an Asian foreign language
-Experience living, working, or studying in Asia
Application Procedures: Please submit the following materials to the online application portal:
-Cover letter (specify dates/times you are available to work)
-Resume
-FWS Award letter
Due to a high volume of applicants, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. No calls, please.

Sigur Center for Asian Studies FWS Staff Assistant – Communications (part-time)

Job Description: The Staff Assistant for Communications will be playing a central role in managing the Sigur Center’s social enterprise, which includes the Asia on E Street blog, Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr accounts. The Staff Assistant for Communications will be expected to draft, edit, and upload content for the Sigur Center’s website pages, social media platforms, emailing lists; create advertisement content for Sigur Center programs and events; design digital and print content; promote the Sigur Center; and preparing additional materials as needed. As a Sigur Center Staff Assistant, the position also entails staffing the Center's front desk, which encompasses answering the main phone line, greeting visitors, and processing mail. Other administrative duties and special projects may include creating spreadsheets and reports, data entry, editing, and supporting Sigur Center events.

Link: https://gwu.joinhandshake.com/jobs/1206804

Hours Per Week: 10
Hourly Wage: $12.50 (DC Minimum Wage)
Required Qualifications:
-Background in social media and communications management
-Strong written communication skills
-Strong customer service and interpersonal skills
-Must possess a Federal Work Study (FWS) Award for the 2017-2018 academic year
Preferred Qualifications:
-Strong interest in Interest in/knowledge of International Affairs and Asia
-Some knowledge of an Asian foreign language
-Experience living, working, or studying in Asia
-Administrative experience
Application Procedures: Please submit the following materials to the online application portal:
-Cover letter (specify dates/times you are available to work)
-Resume
-FWS Award letter
Due to a high volume of applicants, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. No calls, please.

Sigur Center for Asian Studies FWS Staff Assistant – Events (part-time)

Job Description: The Staff Assistant for Events will be primarily responsible for helping Sigur Center staff manage external events and conferences. This may include assisting with event planning, catering, and scheduling; researching potential speakers; producing and posting event flyers and posters; managing event registration; providing logistical support during events in areas such as photography and audio/video recording; drafting and uploading event write-ups onto online platforms; promote the Sigur Center; and preparing additional materials as needed.
As a Sigur Center Staff Assistant, the position also entails staffing the Center's front desk, which encompasses answering the main phone line, greeting visitors, and processing mail. Other
administrative duties and special projects may include creating spreadsheets and reports, data entry,
editing, and supporting Sigur Center events. The Staff Assistant will also assist in managing the Sigur
Center's social enterprise, including the Asia on E Street blog, Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr accounts.

Link: https://gwu.joinhandshake.com/jobs/1206835

Hours Per Week: 10
Hourly Wage: $12.50 (DC Minimum Wage)
Required Qualifications:
-Background in event planning and management
-Strong written communication skills
-Experience in managing media content, including photography and audio/visual recording
-Strong customer service and interpersonal skills
-Must possess a Federal Work Study (FWS) Award for the 2017-2018 academic year
Preferred Qualifications:
-Strong interest in Interest in/knowledge of International Affairs and Asia
-Some knowledge of an Asian foreign language
-Experience living, working, or studying in Asia
-Administrative experience
Application Procedures: Please submit the following materials to the online application portal:
-Cover letter (specify dates/times you are available to work)
-Resume
-FWS Award letter
Due to a high volume of applicants, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. No calls, please.

Monday, December 11, 2017

Visiting Scholar Spotlight: Jong-Gu Lee, ROK

The Game of Chicken and U.S. Policy toward North Korea After North Korea’s 6th Nuclear Test


I am Jong-Gu Lee, a visiting scholar from the Republic of Korea conducting research at the Sigur Center for Asian Studies at the Elliott School of International Affairs. I am honored to study at the Elliott School, which is known to be one of the top schools for international relations. These last six months in Washington D.C. have been the best time of my life because I was able to learn many things. I spent my time here taking several classes that I was interested in and attending meaningful seminars and colloquiums. I am sure that the experience here will lead me to a better future.

During this period, I conducted a research project about potential U.S. policy responses to North Korea’s sixth nuclear test by applying a specific variant of game theory known as “Chicken-Game.” My study also includes policy suggestions for the ROK government. Chicken game theory was applied to the research because the nature of the conflict between the United States and North Korea aligns with this theory’s proposition. In other words, the theory is applicable to my study because the conflict of the two states is related to the nuclear issue, and neither side can abandon their stances on the issue.

The primary assumption of chicken game theory is as follows: two teenagers, here designated as player A and player B, who line up at opposite ends of a stretch of roadway drive stolen cars at full speed directly toward one another. Each player has two choices - to swerve or not to swerve - but whoever swerves first is “chicken” and loses the game. Thus, there are four possible outcomes for this chicken game:
(1) If A and B players swerve at the same time, both are “chicken,” but neither loses face;
(2) if A swerves and B does not, then A is“chicken” and B gains status among peers;
(3) alternatively, if B swerves and A does not, the payoffs are reversed;
(4) finally, if both continue straight ahead without swerving, they both crash, and then
the payoff in this case is death.

The result of my study shows that the U.S. and North Korea have both increased threat levels to compel other states to change their behavior to serve their own respective goals. The U.S. government will continue to maintain a hawkish stance on North Korea in the future. While the U.S. will increase pressure to compel significant changes in North Korea’s behavior, it will also prepare for contingencies with military options. At the same time, the U.S. will continue to conduct negotiations with North Korea under the table for a dramatic agreement.

Based on the result of my study, I have three suggestions for the ROK government. First, the ROK should recognize that it is riding in the car with the U.S., and based on that notion, the ROK must pursue consistent policies toward North Korea’s nuclear program along with strengthened U.S.-ROK cooperation. Second, the ROK should perform two-track policies by continuing sanctions and  pressure against North Korea, while maintaining room for negotiation. Third, in terms of military measures, the ROK should validate the credibility of the U.S. extended deterrence; furthermore, it should be ready to retaliate against North Korea’s potential provocations or full-scale war by establishing and declaring practical rules of engagement.

Last but not least, I want to emphasize once again that repeated “Chicken-Games” can significantly reduce the chances of survival among players. We have to genuinely consider whether we have
become desensitized to North Korea's provocations and nuclear threats. North Korea’s nuclear weapons are not acceptable for the prosperity and peace of the Korean Peninsula, and the chicken games with North Korea should no longer be repeated. Therefore, the ROK and the United States must establish an effective and mutually-agreed strategy to resolve the North Korean nuclear issue at this time.

While this summary does not fully explore or explain the details of my research I hope it will help anyone who is interested in researching about North Korea’s nuclear program and potential U.S. policy responses to that program. I would like to thank the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Elliott School, and the George Washington University for providing me with the opportunity to conduct this
research endeavor, and thank the readers for their interest in this topic.

Internship with TextOre

TextOre
TextOre is looking for an intern or junior analyst who is passionate about following political and geostrategic news in China and/or Russia. The position requires proficiency in listening to and reading Chinese or Russian. Interns will be paid a stipend based on the number of hours they work.
Daily responsibilities would include reading through national-level Russian and Chinese sources and writing summaries of articles that cover topics like South China Sea issues, One Belt, One Road projects, business agreements, relationships with foreign countries, and breakthroughs in science and technology. Previous experience in producing academic-level reports and familiarity with writing queries, updating databases, using data analytic software, and advanced web searching are considered a plus. 

Interested applicants should submit their resume to Rick Gunnell (rgunnell@textore.net). Potential candidates will be sent a proficiency test that is intended to assess both your skills in summarizing an article and one-to-one translation. Candidates only interested in translation may work remotely; full-time candidates are expected to work in Fairfax, VA. Only U.S. citizens may apply for this job.